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Jean Grey is a Horrible Character and Hollywood is Clueless

After the failure of X3 I would have thought scriptwriters in Hollywood would have learned their lesson: Jean Grey is kind of a boring character because her personality is so flat.

But no, they decided to try again for another film, following the same idiotic formula wherein she remains a flat 2-dimensional character.

So much emphasis is placed on her powers and her love interest(s), they always forget to develop her personality.

Oh and the producers... they conveniently forget about other female characters like Rogue who were historically more popular. Rogue was the focus of the very first X-Men film, but since then has been cut out despite being a fan favourite amongst comic book fans. Jean as a character was never particularly popular. The phoenix force was basically a crutch to make her character more interesting. You see this regularly with YA fiction... whenever a character is too boring writers just give the character a special ability to make them more interesting.
 
 
 
 
It is the reason why you see OP (over-powered) characters so much in the genre. The character is boring so the solution is to make them OP.

Oh and to give them a love triangle. Back in X3 it was the Jean-Scott-Wolverine love triangle that they tried to use, but they did a disappearing act on Scott early in the film so the love triangle bit became more one sided and fell flat.

So without the love triangle crutch and the dark phoenix crutch, what does Jean Grey have going for her? What is her personality? How does she grow as a character? Sadly her character is flat and there isn't much character growth, so is there any surprise the new Dark Phoenix film falls flat in the box office?
 
Dark Phoenix's Domestic Total as of Jun. 11, 2019: $39,190,534. Foreign: $103,743,621.

So $142,934,155... On a film that cost over $200 million to make. They are going to be lucky if they break even.

I am not surprised. It is the same shoddy writing they keep making to suck in teenagers, not realizing that the fans of the X-Men are mostly people in their 30s-40s-50s who grew up with the comic books.

So the producers have made a second error. They have forgotten who their real audience is. They should not be targeting teenagers. They should be targeting people in their 30s to 50s. This effects both how to write the story as a more mature story, but also how to market it to a specific audience.

Yes, X-Men is primarily about teenagers... but the fans of the X-Men are older. Younger audiences (teens and young adults) don't care about X-Men as much. The younger audience has already moved on to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and when competing against the MCU Avengers it is pretty obvious who is going to win.

Solution? This film might be the final nail in the coffin for the Fox owned X-Men Franchise... but there is good news. Disney bought them out. The whole franchise can be rebooted within the MCU five years from now. (We might finally get to see Wolverine and the Hulk working as a team.)
 
 
Hot Tip for any future actresses being asked to portray Jean Grey. Your contract should specifically state that there is no way in hell you will appear in any film portraying a 3rd version of Dark Phoenix. Hollywood should just give it a rest. The character is a flop regardless of whether you put a former Bond Girl in the role or whether you hire a former Game of Thrones star.

Fantasy Maps Vs Characters

I recently read the following post arguing about why characters in a fantasy book should rarely ever have a map of the region they are in, during which they make some valid points.

https://www.tor.com/2019/05/28/fantasy-maps-dont-belong-in-the-hands-of-fantasy-characters/


However there are exceptions.

#1. What if the character is a cartographer or navigator aboard a ship?
#2. What if the character is an explorer?
#3. What if the characters are discussing war preparations and need a map so they know how far away things are relative to each other?

And there are certainly more exceptions. A merchant for example might need a map to prevent getting lost when traveling through lands they are unfamiliar with.

Indeed the map could even play a central role in the plot, like in the case of a map to buried treasure.

The map could even be a magical artifact that allows people to teleport to a location of their choosing.

Or it could be a non-magical map which shows the locations of portals, artifacts or other items.

My point is that there are plenty of exceptions to why characters might need or desire a map of the region.

Now in fantasy video games it is a totally different matter... The map serves to help guide the player through the game to specific cities and regions for the player to explore.

And such a map might play an important role in the upcoming Witcher show on Netflix.

Below: Witcher 3 Wild Hunt World Map


One of my favourite maps from video games is the map from Kingdom Come Deliverance, which shows the relatively small region of Bohemia from the video game, but shows it in great detail. Plus the game itself is highly detailed and realistic, with some of the best graphics I have ever seen in any game, plus realistic swordplay and archery. I am definitely a fan.


The Silly Tropes of Bad Fantasy Writing


The Too Convenient Special Ability Trope

I blame the writers who write this nonsense. How can they sleep at night repeating the same tired tropes?

Giving a character special abilities right at the beginning, without having earned them, is far too convenient.

To me a hero's journey should be hard. It should be filled with challenges, some of which they fail at. If they are getting better at something it is because of months or years of practice/failure, and they should never be the equal or greater to any powerful villain(s) who has spent years or decades honing their skills.

It should never be the hero wakes up one day, discovers they have magical powers s/he never knew they had, and then masters their abilities in a few days/weeks/months. I have seen this trope in so many books, usually books aimed at young women, and it is utterly too convenient.

That doesn't mean it is just female lead characters either. Harry Potter also goes through this trope. He suddenly discovers he is a wizard, enters a secret alleyway, a secret train station, and goes to a secret school for wizards. Convenient? I haven't got to the part where he gains an extra powerful wand, is gifted an invisibility cloak, and is just conveniently really good on a broom. See? All too convenient. He even defeats the baddie at the end of Book 1 by simply touching him. Didn't even know he had that power. He just touches the baddie and the baddie ends up doing his impression of the Wicked Witch of the West melting.

Often the convenient hero also operates on a fate based plot... boring. So boring. Again, Harry Potter is guilty of this too, because of the whole prophecy thing. So basically he is fated to defeat Voldemort.
 
So why is this trope boring? Because you already know the ending. Once you learn that the hero is fated / prophesized to beat the villain, then it is now a foregone conclusion. You already know the ending. There wasn't really any surprise when Harry Potter finally defeats Voldemort in Book 7. That was the only possible ending.
 
At least Harry Potter had to go through 6 years of school before he was ready to face Voldemort, so at least his hero's journey was measured in years.

Instead in this trope what you often see is the following:
 
  1. Hero discovers they are special.
  2. Hero meets villain, magically survives the encounter.
  3. Hero masters their special ability in a very short period of time.
  4. Hero defeats villain in the 3rd act.
  5. The end.

So the hero somehow masters their special abilities in a short period of time and then defeats the main villain in Act 3, a person who has spent years or decades mastering their own abilities. Boring and unrealistic.

So how do you change this?

For starters, stop giving the hero special abilities.

Also don't give them a magical sword/etc when they first start out. (See the next trope further below.)

Example...

Years ago I wrote a book wherein the lead character is a half-demon. Guess what powers she got? None. She had absolutely no magical powers. She didn't even know she had half-demon blood. Her blood plays a role in the plot, but it has zero effect on her abilities. She is otherwise a normal human.

Now she does start with a sword that is reasonably well made, but it isn't magical. It is just a sword.

A plain hero with a plain sword. No powers. No magic.

That means she has to survive based on her skills and wits. Problem solving her way through dangers and challenges, not just blasting her way through problems with newfound magical abilities.
 
She also befriends some allies along the way, which also helps.

That makes a much more interesting story, in my opinion.
 
And because I follow the "Die Hard" approach to heroism, I believe my heroes should bleed. A lot. They should get injured and bleed. All sorts of things happen to them. I don't have them crawling through broken glass or air ducts, but the principle is there. If they are going to survive then they need to earn it.
 
And that to me is heroic. The hero who has no special abilities but is determined to survive and save the day. That is why John McClane is such a classic hero, precisely because he is an average joe type character who refuses to give up. (Now you might think, wait, if he is a classic, doesn't that make him a trope? No. A trope is overused and unremarkable because it has been done before, often poorly. A classic is memorable because it is done well and the storyteller knew what they were doing.)


 
The Too Convenient Magical Item Trope
 
Ever read a book where the hero finds a super powerful magical weapon in the first three chapters? Like Arthur pulling the sword out of the stone? Or Harry Potter gaining his extra powerful wand and later his invisibility cloak? Or Bilbo Baggins (or Frodo Baggins) gaining a magical sword and an invisibility ring?

This is another trope that bothers me.

Bilbo at least had to wait longer before he gained a magical sword and ring, Frodo didn't have to wait at all. He inherited both of them from Bilbo close to the beginning of LOTR.

I don't have a problem with characters gaining magical items later in the story, like halfway through the book or near the end, but right at the beginning is awfully convenient.
 
To me the trope of gaining a magical item at the beginning of the book is almost as bad as the hero discovering they have a special ability. Both are far too convenient.

If a hero gains objects or items along the way, they should be more mundane until at least halfway through the book.
 
Sometimes the item might not even usable by the hero, but perhaps goes to a lesser character, or worse, a villain gains possession of the item.
 
I did this several months ago when I was re-writing an upcoming novel. One of the lesser characters gained a magical item close to the halfway point in the book. It was a weapon the main character wasn't particularly skilled with, so it made sense the person who knew how to use it properly should get it.
 
And see? Isn't that more realistic?
 
The characters have skills, and often also lack certain skills. My main character didn't know how to use the weapon in question, but one of his companions not only knew how to use it, but was able to use it well.
 
That makes good logical sense after all. Not every magical item our hero finds he should automatically be able to use properly. Indeed, most weapons he finds should be alien to him. Does he know how to use a horseman's flail? Nope. Not a clue. A glaive? Nope, never even seen one.
 
It is one thing for a hero to pick up a sword and use it, a sword is still a sword after all. But that doesn't mean he is skilled with it. A fencer trained with epees should not be able to use a katana with the same measure of skill. They are two very different swords.

If the hero was skilled in a specific weapon, like harpoons, wouldn't it be awfully convenient if they just found a magical harpoon when they were not expecting to? It makes no sense.

And if you're like "But he was destined to find it!" then you are missing the whole point. Destiny and fate are also too convenient.


Conclusions and Exceptions

Fables and fairy tales. That is where these tropes belong.

If a writer wants to write using these tropes, they can still do so, but they should focus more specifically on writing fables, fairy tales and similar storytelling methods. Something similar to the Princess Bride would be okay too, as that is a swashbuckling fantasy/romance/comedy and comedies can certainly take advantage of silly tropes.

Because that is what they are. Silly.

So lets amend that list: Fables, fairy tales and comedies. That is where silly tropes belong.

And any writer who is writing a "fantasy romance" using the above tropes should be reminded that their book is a dime a dozen on Amazon, which has been flooded with fantasy romances so that their book does not stand out in the thousands of books with the same basic plot I mentioned further above with the following changes.

  1. Heroine discovers they are special.
  2. Heroine meets Boy #1.
  3. Heroine meets villain, magically survives the encounter.
  4. Heroine meets Boy #2. Love triangle ensues.
  5. Heroine masters their special ability in a very short period of time.
  6. Heroine defeats villain in the 3rd act.
  7. Love triangle ends somehow. One of the boys becomes a villain or dies. The other one later marries the heroine.
  8. The end.

There are literally thousands or tens of thousands of self-published books on Amazon with that same basic plot, all aimed at young women. (And you can often buy them for free due to promo deals. I know, I have gained quite a few for free and then discovered it was another poorly written love triangle disguised as a fantasy.)

Seriously, someone could use this plot, but make it a comedy and it would be so much better.

They could call it "Revenge of the Glitter Vampires" or something similar. Make it clear from the very beginning that it is a comedy. They could give ALL the vampires their own magical swords, so that they are all special in their own special way.

You know how in school these days kids are told that they are all special? All of them are special. Every one. I wonder if that social conditioning played a role in the desire for these young writers to want their main character to be "special" too? So is it millennials and centennials who are to blame for this trope? Quite possibly.

In contrast I was born in the 70s and went through the 80s and 90s. We learned the hard way that if you wanted to be special, you had to earn it. You have to strive for it. Nobody is going to hand you special abilities on a golden platter. You need to have a work ethic and a willingness to hone your craft.

Good night!

12 Marketing Tips for Fantasy Authors

Note - Most of the marketing tips below are geared towards self-publishing, however because some publishing companies simply publish your book and spend very little on marketing it is often up to the author to actually make the extra effort to get the books to start selling well, often by doing book signings, going to trade shows, etc. So it is often up to the author to do these things even if they do have a publisher. (Some publishers are lazy and are weighing the financial risks.)



#1. Make a professional website.

Think of your website as an online brochure for your writing. If your brochure looks unprofessional, who will want to buy a book from you?

I recommend designSEO.ca, a company that does both website design and search engine optimization. Their specialty is search engine friendly website design. However any professional website designer could certainly do the job for you. Your primary goal is to make your site look professional so that potential buyers are not turned off by a website that looks like an amateur made it.

Hot Tip 1 - Before contacting a website designer, figure out what content you want to be on your website first. Write out the whole website like you are making a brochure before you contact the website designer. This allows the website designer to give you a more accurate quote for how much it will cost to create your website.

Hot Tip 2 - If your goal is to be able to update your website yourself you may wish to either learn HTML or choose a platform that allows you to create/design the website yourself and be able to update your website easily. Otherwise if you are regularly updating your website it will get expensive to be paying your designer $30 per hour each time you do a small update.

#2. Have Business Cards and Bookmarks Made.

A fellow author recommended the bookmarks. I have seen other authors who use business cards, but bookmarks can work just as well as a business card in terms of containing the same information, but in a different shape. The benefit of this kind of "swag" is that people are less likely to throw out a bookmark than a business card (but business cards are easier to carry in your wallet/purse). Once people have the bookmark/business card they are also more likely to look up your work and make a purchase.

Having business cards/bookmarks allows you to interact face-to-face with potential fans. There might even be a surprise factor when they think you are giving them a business card and then they realize it is a bookmark. This creates a more memorable experience and every time they look at the bookmark they will be reminded of the time they met you, shook your hand, and they might be curious enough to buy your book.

Hot Tip - Hiring a graphic designer to make your business cards / bookmarks makes them look even more professional. More expensive, yes, but also more likely to win over potential buyers of your books.

#3. Make a professional Amazon Author page.

How to Setup Amazon Author Central and Your Author Page
https://kindlepreneur.com/amazon-author-central-page/

If you are self-publishing and promoting your work on Amazon, this is pretty much a necessity. However many self-published authors forget to actually make their author page, so make a note to actually do this and also use it.

Hot Tip - Make a paperback version of your books on Amazon. Amazon isn't just for ebooks any more. You can now make and sell paperback and hardcover versions too. Many people prefer to read a physical book so having physical copies of your books for sale means you are effectively doubling or tripling your available audience of buyers.

#4. Claim your Author Profile on Goodreads.

How to Claim your Author Profile on Goodreads
https://www.goodreads.com/author/program

Claiming your profile on Goodreads is a good way to get more ratings and reviews of your work. Amazon only allows people who are in good standing who have purchased over $50 worth of things off Amazon to post reviews. Furthermore, Amazon tracks your Facebook friends so that your friends cannot post reviews on Amazon, thus Goodreads is an excellent alternative for reviews as anyone can post reviews on there.

Hot Tip - Invite your friends who are big into reading fantasy to join Goodreads. They might even read your books and leave some nice reviews. This will help to get the ball rolling.

#5. Fatten your eBooks.

Fatten your ebooks with extra pages by including Author's Notes, About the Author, Books by Author, List of Social Media, etc. You should also include things like:


  • Maps of your fantasy world.
  • Illustrations, if any.
  • A dedication.
  • A thank you note to anyone who helped during the writing / editing process.
  • Table of Contents.
If you buy ebooks by popular / successful authors on Kindle/Kobo/etc you may notice that many of them also fatten their books to make them appear longer than they actually are. This allows them to add extra pages to the length of the book and a longer wordcount.

Further more, the fattening of your book is very handy for marketing reasons. It allows you to include a list of other books you wrote, which encourages readers to go out and buy your other books. Likewise having sections for About the Author, Author's Notes, a List of Social Media accounts and other topics can also be very beneficial to get readers to buy your other books, follow you on social media, etc.

#6. YouTube Readings and Promos.

Pick a chapter or two from your book and read it on YouTube. You could do this live (and don't care whether you make any mistakes while reading) or you can more carefully narrate the book and edit out any mistakes you make. Depends which method you think will work best.

You can also make videos to announce promotional sales / free books, timing them with Amazon's KDP Select program.

Got something to say to your fans? Make a personal video.

Hot Tip - Why pay for a social influencer when you could become a social influencer? Promote your own work and don't rely on others to do it for you. This way when people do promote your work on YouTube they are doing it for free.

#7. Twitter and Instagram.

You can use Twitter and Instagram in much the same way as you use YouTube, uploading videos (usually shorter videos), but you can also post short updates on Twitter about your writing if you want to, interact with fans, and interact with other authors.

eg. I follow several authors I find to be of interest on Twitter and I am always pleased when fellow authors respond.

#8. Facebook Page and Facebook Groups...

So you can waste a lot of time on Facebook and accomplish nothing if you are not careful. You have been warned. I regulate my time on there.

You should absolutely have a Facebook page, where you can post the same videos and information you post on YouTube, Twitter and Instagram.

However Facebook also has a lot of groups you can join about fantasy books where you can potentially promote your books and get sales / reviews of your work.

Joining groups for Fantasy Authors won't bring in the sales, as these people are more interested in selling their own books, but that is a good place to meet similar authors who you could collaborate with on anthologies if that is something you are interested in. Those groups are also a good place to discuss the writing process and ideas.

The one group I am going to recommend is joining Fantasy Authors & Marketing, a group specifically geared towards authors both sharing their work and also sharing marketing techniques. In fact I am going to be posting this blog post on there shortly.

#9. Get a Discord account.

So Discord was originally used (and still is used) by gamers as a forum to discuss video games, but it is increasingly also being used by people wishing to discuss movies, TV shows and books.

Having a Discord account allows you to communicate directly with people who read fantasy books and mention your book in the process. I don't recommend using it for blatant marketing, but rather as a way to engage with fans of the fantasy genre.

Discord also allows you to stream video, which means you could do live readings of a chapter of your book.

Discord is increasingly popular, which is why it made this list. However if you aren't really into conversing with potential fans then maybe Discord is not for you.

Hot Tip - Try not to offend people when talking to fans. No better way to get a negative review than to annoy people.

#10. Search Engine Optimize your Book Title.

There are many ways you can use SEO to promote your book, but depending on your book's title it might be wise to do what is known as a Google Bomb.

A Google Bomb is when you use SEO techniques to promote a specific phrase, often a common saying. Take for example "Or Die Trying". (This is purely an example, if there is actually a book by that name that is pure coincidence.)

So you create lots of links using that specific phrase which goes to your book listing (either on your website or on Amazon), which may or may not contain that phrase as well. It is certainly easier if your book title is the phrase in question, but it doesn't have to be. It could simply be a phrase used in the description, or it could be part of the tagline or logline.

If your Google Bomb is successful, whenever someone types in the phrase in question the very first result at the top of the search will be your book. The goal here is to get volume, more people seeing your book equals more people who may be tempted to buy and read your book.

Even if your book title is not a popular phrase you should still spend some time promoting the book in links / SEO so that when people do eventually type in your book title that they can find your book easily.

Hot Tip - W
hile you are at it you should Google Bomb your own name (or your pseudonym if you are using a different name when publishing) so that when people do a search for the name they can find your website easily. If you use multiple pseudonyms you should have them all go to your main website.

#11. Pay-Per-Click Pros and Cons

Okay, so you need to experiment with Pay-Per-Click / PPC advertising before you learn how it works. I cannot summarize it fully in a few paragraphs in any adequate means. The point here is that you don't want to waste your money advertising your book if it is not selling, thus experimentation is key.

Furthermore there is a pricing issue to consider. If you are selling your book for $2.99 each then you are going to have a hard time making a profit. You might be spending anywhere from 5 cents to 20 cents per click, and because Amazon takes 30% of each sale you only make $2.09 per sale and Amazon takes the other 90 cents. It might take you 10 or more clicks just to get 1 sale, thus costing you $2 or more just to make 9 cents. You could even lose money doing this.

What might potentially work is when you are selling a longer book, a trilogy or a set of books for $9.99. Suddenly your profit margin has shifted. For every book sold you make $6.99 and Amazon takes $3. If it costs you $2.50 to get one sale, suddenly advertising via PPC does actually make more sense as you make $4.49 off every sale.

If you can get that cost down further to less than $1 by paying perhaps 5 cents per click then your profit margin just went up.

The other issue with PPC is branding. Sometimes it isn't about getting people to click on your advertisement. Sometimes it is more important to build brand name recognition, but this usually isn't something you should worry about until you are more successful and can afford to focus on branding.

Hot Tip - If paying for clicks in an effort to get sales is not working or seems like a silly method to you, then don't do it. Nobody is forcing you to. Also even if it does work for the first while, it may eventually stop working due to saturation levels. You may need to only to do this during the initial book launch and then phase it out after 3 months or so.

#12. Make a Blog.

So I have had Nerdovore as a blog since 2011, but I only recently started to use it to promote my writing. Usually I use it for talking about Game of Thrones, Dungeons and Dragons, fantasy cartography/map-making, "nerd food", and all sorts of nerdy topics. In the past 8 years this blog has gone from a hobby to a profitable hobby. I make money off the advertising on the side, so that is a nice bonus.

I also use this blog to promote my other website, Cardio Trek, which hosts my personal training / sports training / archery business. Archery students come from all over the world (eg. South Korea, Saudi Arabia, the USA) just to study archery here in Toronto under me. So that is working out for me financially. I cannot complain.

So it makes sense that I should also use Nerdovore to promote my writing, which in my case often means talking about the writing process with respect to fantasy writing and rarely even mentioning my own work. I suppose I should talk about my own work more often, but lately I have been more interested in blogging on subjects related to sub-genres, book lengths, where I get inspiration from, etc.

Note - You don't need a blog. It isn't a necessity. Some authors use their Facebook pages as a blog. eg. Tomi Adeyemi's Facebook page is essentially a blog and she has a tonne of followers.

However blogs do have several advantages over Facebook pages and other social media platforms in that you can control the visuals and control what the visitor sees. It is very easy for someone visiting a Facebook page to browse away to different topics, click on advertising, etc. But if they are on your blog then the only advertising they see should be yours, usually for your books or your swag you are selling. (Or in my case I have my books, my archery lessons, or my Google advertising.)

Hot Tip - Having a blog is also a great way to post samples of your chapters, short stories, or even shorter examples of your work such as poetry or fables.



Happy Writing and Marketing!

How to Organize a Fantasy Anthology

Earlier today I had an interview with speculative fiction writer Eric Olive, who organized the Kickstarter for the speculative fiction anthology "Deep Signal".

I am going to add a link to the book on Amazon when it becomes available. At present it isn't available on Amazon just yet. So you will have to wait a bit, but feel free to Google it in case it becomes available sooner than I expect.



I am not going to post the interview in its entirety, but I am going to record some notes regarding publishing an anthology in the manner which he did. So the notes below are my notes, not direct quotes per se.

Notes

#1. Get a good contract template prepared for all the writers participating, which includes their word count range and payment agreement (eg. per word agreement).
#2. Create a database/list of all relevant data: Shipping addresses, PayPal accounts, other methods of payment, payment status, payment records/receipts.
#3. Make sure everyone gets paid. Hence the need to record payment status.
#4. Take care of your writers!
#5. Kickstarter [and similar websites] are one method of funding such a book to make sure they all get paid. Note that Kickstarter takes about 7.5% of the budget if you raise funds via Kickstarter.
#6. Get at least 2 big name authors and pay them top industry rate. 9 to 10 cents per word. (Pro rate is 6 cents per word.)
#7. Get it in the contracts that authors, especially the big name authors, must hype the book on social media at least 3 times.
#8. Make a press kit to help the authors promote the anthology.
#9. Promote the finished book on YouTube, Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, etc.
#10. Get an ISBN number.
#11. Promote on Amazon and Ingram.
#12. Expect the project to take 6 to 12 months from start to the end of the editing process.
#13. Editing is the biggest hurdle.
#14. Life will interfere with the process.



Additional Notes / Conclusions

#1. If this anthology is very low budget, make sure all participants know they might only be paid a small amount.
#2. Honestly I think authors should be encouraged to hype the book 10 or more times. The more the merrier when it comes to marketing.
#3. If the budget allows, have print copies of the book made too.
#4. A person organizing an anthology should be highly motivated to finish the project. If they aren't motivated enough the project will be dead in the water.
#5. Get a professionally made book cover.


So why am I posting about this?

I am thinking of organizing a fantasy anthology and I am currently in the planning stage / looking for possible authors.

Unlike Eric, whose first foray into anthology has a $17,000 budget so he can get some big name authors, I am not interested in hiring big name authors. It would be nice I suppose, but hiring a big name author to write a short story can get awfully expensive.

How Much to Pay Authors

Top industry rate, as noted by Eric, is 9 to 10 cents per word. So a 15,000 word short story might cost you $1350 to $1500 to get the publishing rights for just one author.

Pro rate in comparison is 6 cents per word. So a similar 15,000 word short story by a less well known author might be $900.

Semi pro rate is 1 cent per word. $150 for each semi pro writer.

Now it should be noted that there are many publishers of short stories who publish fantasy / sci fi / speculative fiction who don't even pay semi pro rates, but instead a flat fee stipend, because their publication is so low budget they cannot afford to pay any more than that. Or worse, the publishers who only give a token copy of the publication or the writers are completely unpaid.

So for example here is a list of Flash Fiction Publishers, which you can see only 5 out of the 11 publishers pay anything, and none of them pay pro rates. The best payer is Leading Edge which pays semi pro rates (or as I call them, sempro).

In some cases the publisher even charges a fee just to submit your work, like in the case of Fiction War.


Study Archery in Toronto

So you want to study archery, but you are having difficulty finding an archery instructor who is local. However there is a solution. If you are willing to travel you can take a crash course in archery in Toronto, Canada. 10 lessons over a two week period will take you from archery novice to an experienced and capable archer.

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